FAQs

What is Sound Art and Improvisation?

A form of music where the musicians play sounds in a free-form manner to create an immediate (“in the moment”) musical composition. It combines performance with communication of emotions and instrumental technique as well as spontaneous response to other musicians (and in this case responding to the audience’s reactions).

What happens during a performance?

Each artist that is performing can quickly interpret the best kinds of sounds to play depending on the audience’s reactions, drawing on their decades of experience in the field of sound art.

What happens after a performance?

Performances will be followed by a debrief session with parents and carers identifying successes, areas for improvement or further exploration, and answering any questions they may have for developing a regular musical practice with their loved one.

Who are the performers?

Robbie Avenaim is the principle performer and founder of Safe in Sound. He specialises in percussion and sound effects. He will be joined by various experienced sound artists in Melbourne and Sydney, to be confirmed on a case-by-case basis. More information about these artists is available on the Our Staff page.

What kinds of disabilities can Safe In Sound performances accommodate for?

We can perform for people with many kinds of (dis)abilities, be it physical, intellectual, neurological, etc. Families will be contacted to discuss scheduling and duration and of the performance, the musical personnel involved, any information about the condition/disability and care/treatment we need to know. There will be ample opportunity to discuss any concerns and ensure all involved are well informed.

Where do the performances take place?

We come to you. Performances will take place in the family home, ensuring the disabled person is comfortable, safe, has access to usual care, and can share the experience with family members and carers.

How long do performances go for?

Depending on the family and disabled person’s needs, each performance typically lasts 1-3 hours. This gives plenty of opportunity for feeding, rest time or other treatment needs, as well as investigating and refining the types of sounds and techniques that the audience enjoy most.

Can family and carers be present?

Yes! We encourage family members and carers to not only listen to the performance but to take part in it too. Our sessions include time dedicated to assisting family members to play music/sound art for/with their loved one with a disability. A carer must always be present to supervise the disabled person and give treatment as necessary.

Can care or treatment be administered during a concert?

Yes. We understand that some conditions require frequent/constant treatment and care, whilst others are more intermittent or responsive. For this reason, our concerts are very relaxed and we ask that any care required be administered as usual. We are happy to stop or keep going with the performance as per the wishes of care givers or the person being treated.

FAQs

What is Sound Art and Improvisation?

A form of music where the musicians play sounds in a free-form manner to create an immediate (“in the moment”) musical composition. It combines performance with communication of emotions and instrumental technique as well as spontaneous response to other musicians (and in this case responding to the audience’s reactions).

What happens during a performance?

Each artist that is performing can quickly interpret the best kinds of sounds to play depending on the audience’s reactions, drawing on their decades of experience in the field of sound art.

What happens after a performance?

Performances will be followed by a debrief session with parents and carers identifying successes, areas for improvement or further exploration, and answering any questions they may have for developing a regular musical practice with their loved one.

Who are the performers?

Robbie Avenaim is the principle performer and founder of Safe in Sound. He specialises in percussion and sound effects. He will be joined by various experienced sound artists in Melbourne and Sydney, to be confirmed on a case-by-case basis. More information about these artists is available on the Our Staff page.

What kinds of disabilities can Safe In Sound performances accommodate for?

We can perform for people with many kinds of (dis)abilities, be it physical, intellectual, neurological, etc. Families will be contacted to discuss scheduling and duration and of the performance, the musical personnel involved, any information about the condition / disability and care / treatment we need to know. There will be ample opportunity to discuss any concerns and ensure all involved are well informed.

Where do the performances take place?

We come to you. Performances will take place in the family home, ensuring the disabled person is comfortable, safe, has access to usual care, and can share the experience with family members and carers.

How long do performances go for?

Depending on the family and disabled person’s needs, each performance typically lasts 1-3 hours. This gives plenty of opportunity for feeding, rest time or other treatment needs, as well as investigating and refining the types of sounds and techniques that the audience enjoy most.

Can family and carers be present?

Yes! We encourage family members and carers to not only listen to the performance but to take part in it too. Our sessions include time dedicated to assisting family members to play music/sound art for/with their loved one with a disability. A carer must always be present to supervise the disabled person and give treatment as necessary.

Can care or treatment be administered during a concert?

Yes. We understand that some conditions require frequent/constant treatment and care, whilst others are more intermittent or responsive. For this reason, our concerts are very relaxed and we ask that any care required be administered as usual. We are happy to stop or keep going with the performance as per the wishes of care givers or the person being treated.